Michael Vlcek

The New Union Treaty: The Desperate Attempt to Save the Soviet Union

The Soviet Union was coming undone. Nationalist political organizations in Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia controlled the parliaments and demanded independence from the USSR in April of 1991. Despite a referendum to preserving the Soviet territories, the three Baltic states refused to participate in the referendum and soon Georgia would join them in declaring independence. Moldavia […]

Attacks from All Sides: The Dissidence to Brezhnev’s Soviet Union

Under Khrushchev, Soviets were allowed to criticize their political leaders as a certain amount of free speech was allowed. Deeply departing the days of terror under Stalin, Khrushchev’s leadership did not go after people whose actions did not threaten the state, allowing a greater expression of artistic and intellectual criticisms of the state. The arrival … Continue reading Attacks from All Sides: The Dissidence to Brezhnev’s Soviet Union

Invading Czechoslovakia: The Brezhnev Doctrine in Practice

Replacing Antonin Novotny as First Secretary of the Czechoslovak Communist Party in 1968, Alexander Dubcek sought to incorporate swift political reforms. After his predecessor failed to quell the rebellious nature of the youths and intellectuals or find any acceptable ways of utilizing these passions for communist objectives, Dubcek implemented a different approach to gain support … Continue reading Invading Czechoslovakia: The Brezhnev Doctrine in Practice

Hungary and the Soviet Union’s Intervention

Matyas Rakosi, the leader of the Hungarian Communist Party, was a strict leader during a time of fierce political repression and economic turmoil. His supporters maintained strengthen even after his resignation in 1953. Due to their political maneuverings, they were able to strip power away from the the new popular prime minister, Imre Nagy in … Continue reading Hungary and the Soviet Union’s Intervention