Comment on Open Access: Journal of Civil and Environmental Engineering by kcarper

OMICS International seems huge, as does the specific engineering part you chose. I think it’s interesting how the area of study can impact the size of the open access journals and/or the amount available to people. For example, my area of study is very small, and there is really only one small journal available.

The Bethesda Statement provides a great description of what open access really means. It contextualizes it and gives great reasoning. I appreciate you providing that.

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Comment on Are grades good motivators? by japsimran92

Thanks for reading, Tim. I believe a combination of project-based learning and experiential learning is the best way. I also think that it is hard to please and accommodate everyone in the class. Right now, theoretical teaching along with big assignments and exams are not fostering learning. I feel that one learns something with practice. A project-based approach along with experiential activities in a class can help you learn more than just theoretical teaching. Obviously, old school blackboard teaching has to stay in place but it can be substituted partially with these approaches. I hope I answered your question.

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Comment on The Carolina Way: To Seem Rather Than To Be by mgbullar

Thanks for your comment! I absolutely believe that UNC should have been punished for this misconduct more than the year of probation they received on their accreditation. It certainly is notable that the university would say “we shouldn’t receive athletic penalties because ANY student could have taken this class.” They’ve thrown academics under the bus to protect the athletics program. This effectively devalues the UNC degree for all of UNC alums, just to protect their student athletes and the profits that their revenue sports bring in.

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Comment on Incentives and Inhibitors by glupton

Hi Michael,

Thanks for your comment. I would argue that grades are a reward system, primarily designed to promote compliance of rote learning. I think a system of feedback and descriptive evaluation would be more meaningful to learners and to those who need to understand the strengths and weaknesses of learners for the purpose of things like admissions and employment.

In regards to your point about learning, I don’t think grades can accurately reflect learning because learning happens differently in different individuals. Learning is a latent trait that we can only, at best, approximate and, at worst, get totally wrong. We should evaluate what students produce (i.e. the application of knowledge). I think that matters much more than achievement on multiple choice tests.

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Comment on Incentives and Inhibitors by Michael Hughes

Hi, great post! I especially like the connections between the Dan Pink video and grading in the school systems. Do you think that the reward/incentive based system could potentially replace modern day grading? Or would an feedback/evaluation style be more appropriate? And if you prefer the evaluation style, is there a way to fairly evaluate individuals who learn differently than others?

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Comment on Grades: A(n) (un)necessary evil(?) by mdhughesjr

Gret post! I really like your use of the term “gamesmanship”. I think it perfectly describes the mindset a lot of students have. “How can I get the top grade” or “how do I pass this test” can almost directly be translated to “how do I get a high score” or how do I beat this level?”. What suggestions or alternatives do you think will help change this?

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Comment on Are grades good motivators? by japsimran92

Thanks for reading. I completely agree with you. One approach would not work for all the fields across education. As you said, engineering and science focus too much on grading quantitive work. I am not against solving equations and maths but that is not the only thing. Learning should be the prime focus instead. And it gets diluted in the race of competitive grading system.

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