What’s a Woman to Do?

Greetings and thanks for tuning into this week’s blogpost! The social identity being discussed this time around is that of the post-Stalin new Soviet woman….but wait, that sounds sort of…

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Lights, Camera, Re(action)

During the post-war years in Soviet Russia the works of the cinema was a distraction to the deep wounds left from the war. Seldom were their films about war and…

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Much Ado About Abortions

After the passing of Joseph Stalin in 1953, the Soviet Union needed a new leader to fill his place. While there were several qualified candidates, one came… Read more “Much…

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More Than a Game

Following Stalin’s death in 1953, the country begins down a path of “De-Stalinization” and the landscape of the Russian culture is shifting once again. When looking at the 1956 module…

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Reformism under Khrushchev

Khrushchev’s reign is, in my opinion, one of the more fascinating periods of Soviet History. It has the Kitchen Debates, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Space Race, and is the…

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Red Star

More Than a Game

Following Stalin’s death in 1953, the country begins down a path of “De-Stalinization” and the landscape of the Russian culture is shifting once again. When looking at the 1956 module on “Seventeen Moments”, I discovered an interesting change occurring among the masses of Russian civilians. A massive shift of culture took over Russia following the …

Continue reading “More Than a Game”

Lights, Camera, Re(action)

During the post-war years in Soviet Russia the works of the cinema was a distraction to the deep wounds left from the war. Seldom were their films about war and the ones that were, focused on leaders and little on soldiers. What was portrayed on scree…

Secrets, Secrets are No Fun

Secrets, secrets are no fun unless you share with everyone. The speech that everyone was talking about, yet nobody knew about, Khrushchev’s “Secret Speech“. To give a little bit of background, this speech was made behind closed doors, solely to the Communist Party’s Twentieth Congress, and there was no press from the Soviet side to […]

The New Line

After the death of Iosif Stalin in 1953 a power struggle ensued among top-ranking members in the Soviet regime. In 1955 Nikita Khrushchev was named First Secretary of the Communist Party, effectively outmaneuvering Georgii Malenkov and Levrentii Beria after a period of “collective leadership”. At the 20th Party Congress in 1956 Khrushchev denounced Stalin’s totalitarian … Continue reading The New Line

Comrade's Corner

Soviet Anti-Religion 101

Following the death of Stalin, the new regime began a social and economic transition that would lead to the provocation of Orthodox Christian views throughout Russia and the dissemination of atheist beliefs. During Stalin’s tyrannical reign, he accepted the existence of the Orthodox Christian institutions in social concerns in local providences. Little did the Russian … Continue reading Soviet Anti-Religion 101

Secrecy Then, Secrecy Now: Khrushchev’s Denunciation of Stalinism

The Twentieth Party Congress (1956) served as a “watershed” moment in the political history of the Soviet Union (Freeze 416). It included many new faces in the delegation, as a means for Khrushchev to consolidate power, and avoided the contentious issue of Stalin’s legacy initially (Freeze 416). That changed with Khrushchev’s “bombshell,” “late-night” speech on … Continue reading Secrecy Then, Secrecy Now: Khrushchev’s Denunciation of Stalinism