Come And Czech This Out

After the events of World War II, the state of Czechoslovakia came under the influence of the Soviet Union and communist ideals. This culminated in 1968 when the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia (KSČ) saw Alexander Dubček, a communist reformer, elected as their First Secretary.

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The Ear-Resistible Crop

Corn, as a fodder (food) crop, was Khrushchev’s proposed solution to the livestock problem, and so it was rampant across agricultural acreage. A particularly productive two years of harvest gave Khrushchev great praise for his “agricultural miracle” and brought corn to the tables of the Soviet Union.

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Come Fly With Us

For the first time since the dawn of the Cold War, an opportunity was presented to Americans and Soviets alike (albeit very limited) to experience the other side’s world in a direct manner. It opened up a broad new world of cultural exchange that could only come to fruition by way of radical political reform.

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The Corn Man

Following the Virgin Lands Program, Nikita Khrushchev was looking for a solution for the U.S.S.R’s next major issue, the Soviets diminished livestock population. To increase the number of livestock yields, Khrushchev began a campaign to promote corn as a feed crop in Russia.

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Coon Rapids?

Khrushchev’s visit to Coon Rapids wasn’t his first time meeting Roswell Garst. Garst had been in the Soviet Union before in 1955 trying to sell his corn. The reason that Garst was in the Soviet Union at this time was because of a sort of agricultural exchange program between the United States and the Soviet Union.

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Khrushchev's War on Religion

The period of “de-Stalinization” led by the Soviet Union’s new leader, Nikita Khrushchev was marked by a rolling back of many of Stalin’s most oppressive and brutal policies. However, one place in which Khrushchev strongly contradicted this trend was in his treatment of the Orthodox Church and religion in general.

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Red Star

Khrushchev’s War on Religion

The period of “de-Stalinization” led by the Soviet Union’s new leader, Nikita Khrushchev was marked by a rolling back of many of Stalin’s most oppressive and brutal policies. However, one place in which Khrushchev strongly contradicted this trend was in his treatment of the Orthodox Church and religion in general. After a period of toleration […]

Coon Rapids?

Who was the first leader of the Soviet Union to visit the Unites States of America? That’s right it was Nikita Khrushchev along with his family, even his son-in-law Alexei Adzhubei back in 1959, from September 15th to the 27th of the same month.  And Khrushchev saw all the sights to see in America, he visited the … Continue reading Coon Rapids?

Come Fly With Us

The 1960’s was an era of precarious relations between the United States and the Soviet Union. The decade started out with proxy clashes by the two superpowers, followed by near nuclear war, and various other close calls. However, this turbulent period of hostility started to change and move towards a detente between the two sworn … Continue reading Come Fly With Us

The Corn Man

Following the virgin lands program, Nikita Khrushchev was looking for a solution for the soviet’s livestock issues. To increase yields, Garsts Khrushchev began a campaign to promote corn as a feed crop. In 1959 he toured middle America to witness Corn production in the united states. I think the nature of the campaign is best …

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Come And Czech This Out

After the events of World War II, the state of Czechoslovakia came under the influence of the Soviet Union and communist ideals. This culminated in 1968 when the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia (KSČ) saw Alexander Dubček, a communist reformer, elected as their First Secretary 1. Once in power, he began to promote his political agenda with a slogan of “Socialism … Continue reading Come And Czech This Out

The Ear-Resistible Crop

It is laid out in the thirteenth chapter of Gregory Freeze’s book, Russia A History, that Khrushchev was not the most likely successor to Stalin; However, he had a great attribute in his ability to relate to the common folk through his concern for popular welfare (409). Khrushchev, after taking power, implemented agricultural reforms specifically …

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Comrades' Corner

The Sino-Soviet Split

Mao Zedong and Stalin (BBC News http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-35427926) On February 24th, 1956 Nikita Khrushchev gave his “Secret Speech” “On the Cult of Personality and Its Consequences” to the assembled delegates of the Communist Party’s Twentieth Congress. In it, Khrushchev harshly criticized Stalin both politically and personally for the violent nature of his government, the cult that surrounded … Continue reading The Sino-Soviet Split

Betrayal at the Kremlin!

Joseph Stalin and Nikita Khrushchev on the tribune of Lenin’s Mausoleum, Moscow, Soviet Union, c1935-c1937. Look at these two men! Don’t they look like they could be best friends? Don’t you think they would share a bottle of good ol’ Russian vodka together? Khrushchev was a member of Stalin’s inner circle. Within 6 months of…

Showdown at Damanskii!

On March 1969, two red behemoths stood on the brink of war. On the Soviet side, hundreds of thousands of soldiers were amassed along the southern border and over a million Chinese faced them. The Communist states of China and Russia, allegedly allies against the global “bourgeoisie” order, were now massed along the border of …

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The Theatre Thaw(?)

  During the period of Stalinism theatre, and other arts were largely homogenized to express Soviet Realism, (see my post on the renowned artist Deyneka) However, at the beginning of destalinization  the ice of homogeneity began to melt. By the mid 1950s there was an obvious struggle against conformity in the arts. The theater, free … Continue reading The Theatre Thaw(?)

Power in Peace: The International Youth Festival

The World Youth Festival is, “an event of global youth solidarity for democracy and against war and imperialism” created with the intention, “to bring together young people of both the socialist and capitalist countries to promote peaceful cooperation and mutual rejection of war.” It indeed makes a great deal of sense that in the newfound …

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